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ashnistrike:

Magical mint and dolphin alliances and bread baking and Leviathan and the Mandelbrot set and intercultural friendships and golem librarians and what it ought to mean to have—and protect—a homeland.

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medeasdragons:

medeasdragons:

The Palace at 4 a.m., Alberto Giacometti

In light of responses people have given me to the query I made in this post, I am going to queue up a daily Work of Art to Save in Apocalypse, a list compiled from my own responses as well as the responses people have given me. There is, understandably, a bias towards art that people were able to experience personally, so there’s disproportionately little non-Western art right now, but if you have stuff to add (including anything from video games to film to sculpture), just ping my askbox.
The Palace at 4 a.m., by Alberto Giacometti,

is a spindly wood scaffolding, sheet of glass, and delicate skeletal structure. Considered by some to be one of Giacometti’s most theatrical works, the scaffold-like structure is reminiscent of a bare-bones stage set. In 1933, Alberto Giacometti wrote that the scenes in this and other sculptures came to him “entirely completed” in visions, and that he tried to reproduce them “in space without changing anything.”
According to Giacometti, The Palace at 4 a.m. was inspired by an all-engrossing six-month love affair with a woman identified only as Denise. “We constructed a fantastical palace in the night,” he wrote, “…a very fragile palace of matches; at the least false movement a whole section of the diminutive construction would collapse; we would always began it all over again.”

Suggested by thisoneiscarl.

medeasdragons:

medeasdragons:

The Palace at 4 a.m., Alberto Giacometti

In light of responses people have given me to the query I made in this post, I am going to queue up a daily Work of Art to Save in Apocalypse, a list compiled from my own responses as well as the responses people have given me. There is, understandably, a bias towards art that people were able to experience personally, so there’s disproportionately little non-Western art right now, but if you have stuff to add (including anything from video games to film to sculpture), just ping my askbox.

The Palace at 4 a.m., by Alberto Giacometti,

is a spindly wood scaffolding, sheet of glass, and delicate skeletal structure. Considered by some to be one of Giacometti’s most theatrical works, the scaffold-like structure is reminiscent of a bare-bones stage set. In 1933, Alberto Giacometti wrote that the scenes in this and other sculptures came to him “entirely completed” in visions, and that he tried to reproduce them “in space without changing anything.”

According to Giacometti, The Palace at 4 a.m. was inspired by an all-engrossing six-month love affair with a woman identified only as Denise. “We constructed a fantastical palace in the night,” he wrote, “…a very fragile palace of matches; at the least false movement a whole section of the diminutive construction would collapse; we would always began it all over again.”

Suggested by thisoneiscarl.

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yoisthisracist:

I feel like any time someone says, “but my black friend says…” there’s a black person going “so, there’s this racist at my work…”

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admiraloblivious:

shinobicyrus:

queerpropaganda:

"can men and women really be just friends??" straight people are so weird

It is a fact that bisexuals can’t make friends. There is only prey.

*makes raptor noises*

(Source: neutroisenjolras, via tilisokolov)

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n0-sudden-revelations:

flatbear:

tickling-your-man-boobies:

dudewheresmycat:

give me the reasons not to reblog this.

they don’t exist

You don’t see many Mumford and Sons gifsets. This is really cool.

YOU DON’T SEE MANY MUMFORD AND SONS GIFSETS

(via wintersoldierfell)

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back-in-the-field:

It’s an all-shipping episode! Carl and Aarthi quickly cover what they enjoyed in the B-plot to, instead, focus on Jake and Amy’s shipping arc in the latter half of the season. Aarthi posits that Amy spends this episode pushing Jake to give her an answer and/or take action. Meanwhile, Jake’s shortsightedness causes him to inadvertently close a window he didn’t even know was open. All this and more in this week’s meta-tastic episode of BITF.

We mention an office map in this episode — that’ll get digitized later this week! 

There’s one point we forget to make in this episode: based on our speculation about what Amy was pushing for Jake to say in this ep, we believe this is why she looks so stunned in the finale. We neglected to connect that last bit in the podcast itself, and without it the explanation is incomplete. 

As always, you can download any of our episodes from our Soundcloud page. Be sure to follow us on Twitter: @BackInTheField !

We love asks, so y’all should keep sending some! :D

—Aarthi

Ships, but not the kind on the ocean

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sonofbaldwin:

Please sign and share.

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Anonymous said: Dear Man: I work as a copyist for a barrister. In the late afternoons, when the others in the office are all out running errands, he has taken to touching me in places that are unwelcome and making suggestions that I, a respectably married lady, dare not countenance. I need the income, however. What do you suggest? Superbly Confused.

ask-a-man:

Dear Superbly Confused,

Ah. One of those: A pillar of the community who is obsessed with his own pillar. I hope we can all agree that no woman should have to choose between the sanctity of her own body and her future income.

You ask me what I suggest, and, as I am a man, naturally I see a solution to your difficult and heart-rending problem. It is actually quite simple. You see, we men could do a great deal to stamp out this sort of behavior. The next time we hear a man joke about the things he is planning to do with his unsuspecting employee, we might tell him that he’s a loathsome toad, stop inviting him to all our public events, and stop sending business his way. If we see someone touching a woman without invitation, why we could cut him from polite (and impolite society) entirely. When a woman comes to us with a horrific tale of male imposition, why, we could take her seriously and impose whatever sanctions necessary on the brute who did her wrong.

Men! We have the power to prevent these sad abuses. Let us band together and stamp out—

Wait one moment. I have just this moment received a notice from the Man-Office. (Women: You may not have heard of the Man-Office. This is for obvious reasons.) The Man-Office tells me that we cannot possibly do this, because we might make the men who have brutally violated and imposed upon women feel badly.

Ah, well, then. Never mind all that. Surely we dare not be so unfeeling as to make terrible people feel badly when they do terrible things.

Yours truly,
Stephen Shaughnessy
Minion of the Man-Office

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Anonymous said: Yo, engineer here. The physicist isn't entirely correct. If you were to create a very large gun, done where the barrel exceeded the height of the atmosphere (~400 km), and used gradual acceleration couple with good timing, you could fire racists into the sun. Of course, they'd be dead in the barrel due to lack of atmosphere, but you can't have everything, I suppose.

yoisthisracist:

Can I just say I fucking love physicists? “Imagine a perfectly spherical racist weighing exactly 100kg” lol.

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Claire’s lover has no tongue. A slave liberated from a heathen temple, Aya cannot tell the story of her stolen voice, or of her and Claire’s unfolding love. She cannot speak her pain, her joy, or her sorrow. And if she sees that which eludes the blind goddess of justice, she cannot bear witness. “In the Sight of Akresa” is a tragic fantasy romance from debut author Ray Wood. (x)

I acquired this story for Tor.com! It filled me with sadness and anger and hurt and wonder.

Claire’s lover has no tongue. A slave liberated from a heathen temple, Aya cannot tell the story of her stolen voice, or of her and Claire’s unfolding love. She cannot speak her pain, her joy, or her sorrow. And if she sees that which eludes the blind goddess of justice, she cannot bear witness. “In the Sight of Akresa” is a tragic fantasy romance from debut author Ray Wood.
(x)

I acquired this story for Tor.com! It filled me with sadness and anger and hurt and wonder.